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End The Epidemic


We can end this epidemic

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End The Epidemic


We can end this epidemic

A note from Groups founder Jeff De Flavio:

      We all care for patients struggling with opiate addiction. We see them in our practices almost every day. As physicians, we feel an obligation to treat their disease.

      We founded Groups so that every person struggling with opiate dependence can get the help they need to regain control of their life. Our protocol driven medical system combines the most effective pharmacological and behavioral therapies to provide superior, affordable outcomes. Most physicians who practice with us are not addiction specialists. They rely on our team-based system – clear guidelines for doctors, a team with deep experience in addiction, and access to consults from our experts – to deliver outstanding care.

      Excellent treatment outcomes only solve half the problem. To end this epidemic, we need everyone to get involved. Physicians deserve a partner they can depend on to make this difficult work convenient and rewarding. Our flexible scheduling, superior remuneration, and short time commitments mean there is no longer an excuse for sitting on the sidelines.

      There are more than a million people in America searching for and unable to find treatment for opiate addiction. Groups offers them a chance to join a trusting and supportive community in which to heal. Every name on a waitlist is someone who wants to escape from addiction and is reaching out for help. Please join us and start empowering patients to get their lives back.

 

Jeff DeFlavio, MD, on behalf of all the physicians at Groups

 

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Exceptional Care


Exceptional care from a team you can trust

Exceptional Care


Exceptional care from a team you can trust

You can help provide treatment for up to 275 people by working just 6 to 8 hours a month on a schedule that works for you. Supported by our clinical team, technology, and protocols at every step, you will intake new clients, monitor patients’ progress, and manage their medication.

You do not need experience with addiction—just an active state license and a DATA 2000 waiver to prescribe buprenorphine. Physicians without a DATA 2000 waiver can obtain one after completing an 8-hour online CME course. This overview has details on the waiver process, including reimbursement by Groups.

 

To get started, contact Chelsea McGorry, Associate Director, at chelsea@joinGroups.com or (603) 790-0832.

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Every Specialty


From psychiatry to surgery, our physicians come from every specialty

Every Specialty


From psychiatry to surgery, our physicians come from every specialty

Justin Clark, General Surgeon, Maine Medical Center                                             

I became a surgeon because I like definitively fixing problems, which is exactly what Groups does. Prior to joining, I had never treated addiction. 99% of the prescriptions I write are for narcotics, but I wasn’t familiar with narcotic addiction. Most patients I see addicted started with prescription painkillers. A lot of physicians stigmatize this disease, but in my eyes it’s our fault. We doled these drugs out and we’re responsible. Our lack of understanding put patients in this position.

I look forward to working with the staff at Groups every time I go because we are all in this together. They’re tremendous people and we truly work as a team. It makes it easy to be dedicated to a client’s recovery. The patients I see are here because they want to get their kids back, they want to get a job. So I will treat people no matter how many failed attempts they’ve had to beat addiction because maybe this will be their time.

Don West, Director, Substance Use Disorders Services at Dartmouth-Hitchcock

Treating opiate use disorders is an area of medicine that I find more gratifying than anything else I’ve ever done. In spite of the reputation that drug users have, I see them getting better, helping each other, and getting their lives back. They are unbelievably grateful when they find that there is help for them.

I’ve been treating addiction since 1985. When we started the Suboxone program at Dartmouth we initially used an obligatory group model. That model continues to be successful. Once people get to know each other and care about each other, they get better. Groups is pioneering a model that is at once both new and also a return to how we have always successfully treated addiction.

My role as a physician is to make sure patients understand what Suboxone is, what it does, and what it can’t do. It’s a different model than you may be used to as a doctor. Your involvement is essential, but the burden of care is shared with the team and our system. Physicians who join Groups need to be able to work with our professionals, trust their judgment and know they will be asked to be involved when necessary. I’ve been spoiled because the staff we have are folks I can really trust.

The most rewarding part is sitting in on sessions run by the counselors and seeing patients' progress. There is a tremendous amount of gratification from being more involved in the patient community than you normally would be as a physician.